Small Town Values.Big City Results.

Blog

Ohio Motorcycle Helmet Laws

05-14-18    

Motorcycle Helmet

Am I Required to Wear a Helmet?

Ohio law only requires a motorcyclist to wear a helmet if he or she is under 18 years of age or if he or she is within the first year of getting a motorcycle license (a novice) or driving with a temporary permit. If the operator of the motorcycle is required to wear a helmet, any passenger must also wear one.

Eye protection is required in Ohio unless the bike is equipped with a windscreen. Both the helmet and safety glasses/eye protection must meet minimum standards set out by Ohio’s Director of Public Safety.

Why You Should Choose to Wear a Helmet

Motorcyclists are about 26 times more likely to die in a crash and five times more likely to be injured in a crash than a person in a passenger vehicle. Motorcyclists who choose not to wear a helmet are three times more likely to suffer a brain injury than motorcyclists who do wear helmets. The goal of helmet laws is to reduce head injuries sustained by the rider in the event of a crash. The most common head injury is a Traumatic Brain Injury, which can cause permanent impairment of higher level cognitive functioning.

Will I Get a Ticket if I Violate the Helmet Law?

Those who violate the motorcycle helmet law are guilty of a minor misdemeanor. The level of misdemeanor will increase if the offender has previously violated the law.

Will my Failure to Wear a Helmet Bar Me from Recovering Damages if I am Injured?

The answer to this question will depend on the laws of the state in which the accident takes place. Since Ohio law does not generally require helmet use by adult motorcyclist with normal operator’s licenses, there is no duty on the part of a motorcyclist to anticipate another person’s negligence and to protect oneself by wearing a helmet. Generally, in a legal action, it cannot be considered that the use of a helmet may have reduced injuries unless there is factual evidence to support contentions that the injuries sustained by the motorcyclist would have been reduced or prevented by the use of such devices. Ohio is a comparative negligence state, which means that even if the you are determined to be negligent in failing to wear a helmet, you may not be entirely barred, if at all, from recovery.


May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month

05-05-18    

Help Hale’s Harley-Davidson and Rinehardt Law Firm get the message out! We are giving away over $900 in prizes including a custom fit modular helmet, a riding jacket with inserts, and a reflective backpack with rain gear and other cool gear!

Click like or comment on the post on our Facebook page for a chance to win! Winners will be randomly selected at 6:00 P.M. on May 31 and their names will be posted on our Facebook page.

We will be blogging all month about motorcycle safety. Like our Facebook page so you will be receive updates and notifications. Please share the post on your timeline to help get the word out!

Rules: This promotion is open only to residents of Ohio. You must be 18 or over to win.


Exploding Takata Airbags

03-09-18    

Airbag

Exploding Takata Air Bags

Defective Takata airbags have caused 15 deaths and more than 180 injuries resulting in the largest safety recalls in U.S. history. The recall affects 45 million cars across 19 manufacturers. Although there was initially an attempt to cover-up the problem, the primary objective right now is to get these defective airbags off of the road.

NHTSA Expands Do Not Drive Warning

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recently announced that they are expanding their “do not drive warning” to include additional models of Ford and Mazda with defective Takata airbags. The MY 2006 Ford Ranger and Mazda B-Series trucks have been added to the “do not drive warning”list. If you have one of these trucks, DO NOT DRIVE IT! Testing showed these trucks pose a grave safety risk.

What Should I Do if I have a Car or Truck on the “Do Not Drive” List?

Contact the manufacturer to schedule a free repair. Ford and Mazda have replacement airbags available now and will tow vehicles to a local dealership. They will also provide free loaner cars, all free of charge. In the Takata air bag recalls, there are priority groups. Parts are only available for certain vehicles starting at certain dates.

Check for Recalls Twice a Year

The NHTSA recommends checking your car’sVehicle Identification Number (VIN) at least twice per year. Your VIN is on the lower left corner of your windshield and also on your car’s registration card. You can also sign up at NHTSA.gov/Alerts to be notified by e-mail if your vehicle is affected by a future recall.

If you or a loved one have been injured due to injuries from shrapnel or shards of metal or debris, contact our team at Rinehardt Law Firm by clicking on the contact us tab or calling 419-LAW-2020 for a free case consultation today.


In Search of Justice: Holding Big Pharma Accountable for the Opioid Epidemic

02-07-18    

Recent news has been inundated with lawmakers and health care providers discussing the opioid crisis and what to do about it, very important and complex issues with no easy answers.

But what we don’t see often discussed is what caused this epidemic to begin with? The answer is astonishingly simple. We, the American people and our medical doctors are victims of fraud at the hands of a number of pharmaceutical companies.

We didn’t get here overnight. This fraud has been perpetrated on the American people over the scan of two decades. We have finally reached a tipping point where the problem can no longer be ignored. We all know someone who has been affected by this crisis. We have seen the devastation it has caused to families in our communities.

How did they do it?

Certain drug companies, like Purdue Pharma, maker and aggressive marketer of OxyContin, intentionally misled doctors with aggressive marketing-including pamphlets, posters, advertising, promotional videos, and direct sales tactics. Although Opioids have never been proven appropriate to treat chronic pain because they carry a high risk of addiction and death, these promotional materials were filled with lies telling doctors the risk of addiction to opioids is miniscule.

Sales reps for the companies were paid huge bonuses and were encouraged to disseminate false information to physicians.The companies went so far as to hire researchers to publish articles based on junk science. The most often quoted “scholarly article” used by the companies to support their claim that the risk of addiction was low is a three-sentence letter to the editor of the New England Journal of Medicine stating so.

Why did they do it?

Again, the answer is simple. The almighty dollar. In 2010 alone, Purdue generated $3.1 billion in revenue from Oxycontin sales. Other drug makers benefited too.

What can we do?

Ohio has already brought a lawsuit alleging negligent misrepresentation, fraud, and unjust enrichment. But the state isn’t the only one harmed by big Pharma’s fraud.County and City governments have paid huge costs as a result of this crisis too, and should also seek justice from the appropriate drug companies through the courts. The drug companies need to pay our communities back not only for what we have already paid in direct and indirect costs for this crisis, but also for the future costs to repair the damage that has been done. We need to take a stand.


Driverless Cars Coming Soon: Lives Will be Saved

02-02-18    

Driverless Car

We have all heard that driverless cars are on the horizon. GM is currently testing a car with no steering wheel or pedals that it says will be ready for the roads in 2019. “Connected” vehicles are also in production, meaning cars will be equipped with Wi-Fi and other communication technology that enables them to share data with other connected vehicles, connected infrastructure and the driver’s smart phone. Many of today’s motor vehicles are already equipped with life-saving technology that helps drivers avoid drifting into adjacent lanes, warns drivers of obstacles when they are backing up, or brakes automatically if a vehicle ahead slows or stops suddenly.

Benefits of Automation

The main benefit of automated vehicles is safety. According to the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 94% of serious crashes are due to human error. More than 35,000 people died in motor-vehicle crashes in 2015. By removing human error, automated vehicles will save thousands of lives and reduce injuries. In addition, automated vehicles have the potential to smooth traffic flow and reduce traffic congestion, saving time and money. New technologies will allow vehicles to constantly transmit and receive information about traffic flow, road conditions, accident, weather, and other driving hazards. Automated vehicles may also provide new mobility options to millions of Americans who are unable to drive due to disability or other limitations.

Ohio is on the Cutting Edge of Automated Safety Technology

DriveOhio, an initiative of the Ohio Department of Transportation, is the state’s new center for Smart Mobility-using the emerging technologies to move people and things from point A to point B in the safest, most cost-effective way. Since 2011, Ohio has invested $14 billion in infrastructure projects, making Ohio’s infrastructure among the safest and most “autonomous ready” in the country, including a 35-mile Smart Mobility corridor. Public and private entities are working together to design, develop, test and use autonomous and connected technologies.

Ready to get Started?

We’re here to help you and your family get back on track after an accident. Reach out to us today for a free case evaluation.